DMA 161: Network Media - Winter 2020



PROJECTS

PROJECT 1: PERSONAL HOME PAGE

Screenshot from Cameron's World website. Image shows multiple cartoon objects like stars and planets and UFO's in outer space.

In this century, specifically the 2010s, our nostalgia has been digitized. Long-term internet users are no longer homesick so much as they’re homepage-sick for an online space that never came to fruition. “There is a very palpable sense of nostalgia for the unfulfilled promises of past utopian vision"...

Emma Madden, "We Found Love in a Fictional Place"

How do you express your identity/identities on the internet? How is that working out for you? What are the limitations? Is there an online experience that was really formative for your identity that no longer exists on the internet? Can you recreate it?

In this project you will be developing a website from scratch that represents some aspect of an identity (autobiographical or fictional) that you want to share with the world. You will research and determine a site concept and build it using HTML and CSS.

You will be graded on a A(4) - F (0) scale. Outstanding or exceptional work will receive As, good work will receive Bs, sufficient work that does nothing more than meet requirements will receive Cs. The final grade will be an average of these three scores:

  • conceptually creativity
  • aesthetic quality
  • technical skill

PART 1: DESIGN CONCEPT AND REFERENCES (DUE 10/27)

  1. Concept (1-2 paragraphs) – Who is your site for? What do you hope to convey with this site? What will be the key elements and concepts behind the experience of your site?
  2. References – Find at least four examples of artist or designer websites or portfolios that inspire you (you are looking for inspiring websites, not just websites of inspiring artists/designers). Include a screenshot, a sentence that tries to sum up their "design concept", and a sentence about what you like about the site and why.

PART 2: FINAL WEBSITE (DUE 11/3)

The final part is to build the site you've conceptualized using HTML and CSS. I would suggest doing this in steps, something like this:

  1. Create an HTML file for each page, and add the basic HTML structure.
  2. Finalize the navigation and make sure the pages link correctly between themselves.
  3. Add a stylesheet and define the basic layout of your pages.
  4. Populate the HTML with content.
  5. Further implement the design with CSS, tweaking HTML as necessary.

The final version should have multiple pages and include around 3-4 sections (for ex. a gallery, blog, fan section, portfolio, etc). The navigation should be clear and the design should be engaging and coherent. Your site should communicate who you are and what you're interested in to the intended audience. You will have 5-7 minutes to present your site to the class, followed by a few minutes of feedback and critique. In your presentation you will want to make clear the concept, functionality, and structure of the site, as well as what you discovered in the process of creating the site.

Some Inspirations:


PROJECT 2: ONLINE COMMUNITIES

Create a website for a community. It can be for a community that you're involved with, one that you admire, or a fictional community. For instance, a site for a colony of robots that lives on the moon, a nonprofit organization of your choice, or a site for a UCLA student group that you're a member of. You can choose to build an entire site for a small community with simple needs or part of a site for a larger community.

The final piece should have a clear concept that is communicated through a fully resolved and implemented design. You are not expected to have a completely working prototype with live data, but you will be graded on how feasible it would be to build your product and how well you've researched the community that you want to build for. Again, your projects should have a clear sense of who the audience might be and how to meet their needs, as well as be as accessible to them as possible (designing for mobile, differently-abled viewers, etc.)

Timeline

  • Concept, References & User Stories Due - 11/19
  • Sitemap, Wireframes & Mockups Due - 11/24
  • Peer Review - 12/1
  • Project Due - 12/8

Each of these three categories will be graded on a A(4) - F (0) scale. Outstanding or exceptional work will receive As, good work will receive Bs, sufficient work that does nothing more than meet requirements will receive Cs. The final grade will be an average of these three scores.

DMA / All Classes ©2020 UCLA Design Media Arts