Author Archive

On Growth and Form

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

On Growth and Form

On Growth and Form
by D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson

Note: this is an abridged edition

Why do living things and physical phenomena take the form they do? D’Arcy Thompson’s classic On Growth and Form looks at the way things grow and the shapes they take. Analysing biological processes in their mathematical and physical aspects, this historic work, first published in 1917, has also become renowned for the sheer poetry of its descriptions. A great scientist sensitive to the fascinations and beauty of the natural world tells of jumping fleas and slipper limpets; of buds and seeds; of bees’ cells and rain drops; of the potter’s thumb and the spider’s web; of a film of soap and a bubble of oil; of a splash of a pebble in a pond. D’Arcy Thompson’s writing, hailed as ‘good literature as well as good science; a discourse on science as though it were a humanity’, is now made available for a wider readership, with a foreword by one of today’s great populisers of science, explaining the importance of the work for a new generation of readers.

Materials for Inspirational Design

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Materials for Inspirational Design

Materials for Inspirational Design
by Chris Lefteri

Materials for Inspirational Design provides today’s designer with a myriad of material possibilities. The book introduces the properties of wood, metal, glass, ceramics and plastic, all in an informative and inspirational format. The book covers a wide range of information its inclusion of both everyday, familiar products and those that are new, exciting and unexpected.

The book is highly informative in that each application is introduced with detailed authorial comment, and numerous interviews with the designers and manufacturers are also included. The book covers a wide range of areas, exploring the application of materials in architecture, interior design, product design, furniture design, fashion and applied arts, all combined with solid technical information.

Making It: Manufacturing Techniques for Product Design

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Making It: Manufacturing Techniques for Product Design

Making It: Manufacturing Techniques for Product Design
by Chris Lefteri

There are many different ways in which a product can be manufactured, but most designers probably know only a handful of techniques in any detail. Using contemporary design as a vehicle to describe production processes, this book covers a broad range of almost 90 production methods with descriptive text, specially commissioned diagrams, product shots, and photographs of the manufacturing process. It will appeal not only to product designers involved in lighting, consumer electronics, packaging, domestic accessories and tableware, but also to interior designers, furniture and graphic designers who need access to a range of production methods, as well as to all students of design.

Nani Marquina

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Bicicleta Rug by Nani Marquina

Rags design firm from Spain

Nani Marquina

Art Forms in Nature

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Art Forms in Nature (Dover Pictorial Archives)

Art Forms in Nature 100 plates

by Ernst Haeckel

Multitude of strangely beautiful natural forms: Radiolaria, Foraminifera, Ciliata, diatoms, calcareous sponges, Siphonophora, star corals, starfishes, Protozoa, flagellates, brown seaweed, jellyfishes, sea-lilies, moss animals, sea-urchins, glass sponges, leptomedusae, horny corals, trunkfishes, true sea slugs, anthomedusae horseshoe crabs, sea-cucumbers, octopuses, bats, orchids, sea wasps, seahorse, a dragonfish, a frogfish, much more.

Experiencing Geometry

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Experiencing Geometry (3rd Edition)

Experiencing Geometry

by David W. Henderson and  Daina Taimina

Institute for Figuring

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

TO FIGURE: To form or shape, to trace, to reckon or calculate, to represent in a diagram or picture, to ornament or adorn with a design or pattern.

The Institute For Figuring is an educational organization dedicated to enhancing the public understanding of figures and figuring techniques. From the physics of snowflakes and the hyperbolic geometry of sea slugs, to the mathematics of paper folding and graphical models of the human mind, the Institute takes as its purview a complex ecology of figuring.

Our activities include lectures, publications and exhibitions.

www.theiff.org

Crochet Coral Reef

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Designed and curated by IFF co-directors:
Christine and Margaret Wertheim

The Institute For Figuring is crocheting a coral reef: a woolly celebration of the intersection of higher geometry and feminine handicraft, and a testimony to the disappearing wonders of the marine world. 

www.theiff.org/reef/

See the installation at Track 16 Gallery, January 10-February 28, 2009:

Track 16 Gallery
Smart Art Press
2525 Michigan Avenue, Bldg C-1
Santa Monica, CA 90404 
Telephone: 310-264-4678
Fax: 310-264-4682

Regular gallery hours during exhibitions are from Tuesday through Saturday, 11 AM to 6 PM

Crocheting the Hyperbolic Plane

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Cabinet: Issue 16 Winter 2004 

Crocheting the Hyperbolic Plane: An Interview with David Henderson and Daina Taimina by Margaret Wertheim 

Until the 19th century, mathematicians knew about only two kinds of geometry: the Euclidean plane and the sphere. It was therefore a deep shock to their community to find that there existed in principle a completely other spatial structure whose existence was discerned only by overturning a 2000-year-old prejudice about “parallel” lines. The discovery of hyperbolic space in the 1820s and 1830s by the Hungarian mathematician Janos Bolyai and the Russian mathematician Nicholay Lobatchevsky marked a turning point in mathematics and initiated the formal field of non-Euclidean geometry. For more than a century, mathematicians searched in vain for a physical surface with hyperbolic geometry…

continue at www.cabinetmagazine.org/

Mathematics and fiber arts

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

 

Mathematical ideas have been used as inspiration for a number of fiber arts including quilt making, knitting, cross-stitch, crochet, embroidery and weaving. A wide range of mathematical concepts have been used as inspiration including topology, graph theory, number theory and algebra.

…Continue on Wikipedia