Archive for the ‘Suggested Readings’ Category

Thursday, March 19th, 2009

PROJECT Y

Summary: Bend wire to ‘Y’ shape, coat Y w/ sculpey, bake sculpey, sand sculpey, use Silputty to coat the baked Y and make a mold, pour mixed latex substance into mold, wait…, remove the 1/2 completed latex Y, cut away at the legs to fit in 3 magnets, place Y back into mold, mummify it w/ tape, pour in latex substance to fill stump, wait…., take out Y and examine, cut away excess parts, then try to attach them to the other Y’s.

Paper & Felt Project Documentation

Monday, March 16th, 2009

On Growth and Form

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

On Growth and Form

On Growth and Form
by D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson

Note: this is an abridged edition

Why do living things and physical phenomena take the form they do? D’Arcy Thompson’s classic On Growth and Form looks at the way things grow and the shapes they take. Analysing biological processes in their mathematical and physical aspects, this historic work, first published in 1917, has also become renowned for the sheer poetry of its descriptions. A great scientist sensitive to the fascinations and beauty of the natural world tells of jumping fleas and slipper limpets; of buds and seeds; of bees’ cells and rain drops; of the potter’s thumb and the spider’s web; of a film of soap and a bubble of oil; of a splash of a pebble in a pond. D’Arcy Thompson’s writing, hailed as ‘good literature as well as good science; a discourse on science as though it were a humanity’, is now made available for a wider readership, with a foreword by one of today’s great populisers of science, explaining the importance of the work for a new generation of readers.

Materials for Inspirational Design

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Materials for Inspirational Design

Materials for Inspirational Design
by Chris Lefteri

Materials for Inspirational Design provides today’s designer with a myriad of material possibilities. The book introduces the properties of wood, metal, glass, ceramics and plastic, all in an informative and inspirational format. The book covers a wide range of information its inclusion of both everyday, familiar products and those that are new, exciting and unexpected.

The book is highly informative in that each application is introduced with detailed authorial comment, and numerous interviews with the designers and manufacturers are also included. The book covers a wide range of areas, exploring the application of materials in architecture, interior design, product design, furniture design, fashion and applied arts, all combined with solid technical information.

Making It: Manufacturing Techniques for Product Design

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Making It: Manufacturing Techniques for Product Design

Making It: Manufacturing Techniques for Product Design
by Chris Lefteri

There are many different ways in which a product can be manufactured, but most designers probably know only a handful of techniques in any detail. Using contemporary design as a vehicle to describe production processes, this book covers a broad range of almost 90 production methods with descriptive text, specially commissioned diagrams, product shots, and photographs of the manufacturing process. It will appeal not only to product designers involved in lighting, consumer electronics, packaging, domestic accessories and tableware, but also to interior designers, furniture and graphic designers who need access to a range of production methods, as well as to all students of design.

Experiencing Geometry

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Experiencing Geometry (3rd Edition)

Experiencing Geometry

by David W. Henderson and  Daina Taimina

Crocheting the Hyperbolic Plane

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

Cabinet: Issue 16 Winter 2004 

Crocheting the Hyperbolic Plane: An Interview with David Henderson and Daina Taimina by Margaret Wertheim 

Until the 19th century, mathematicians knew about only two kinds of geometry: the Euclidean plane and the sphere. It was therefore a deep shock to their community to find that there existed in principle a completely other spatial structure whose existence was discerned only by overturning a 2000-year-old prejudice about “parallel” lines. The discovery of hyperbolic space in the 1820s and 1830s by the Hungarian mathematician Janos Bolyai and the Russian mathematician Nicholay Lobatchevsky marked a turning point in mathematics and initiated the formal field of non-Euclidean geometry. For more than a century, mathematicians searched in vain for a physical surface with hyperbolic geometry…

continue at www.cabinetmagazine.org/

Mathematics and fiber arts

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

 

Mathematical ideas have been used as inspiration for a number of fiber arts including quilt making, knitting, cross-stitch, crochet, embroidery and weaving. A wide range of mathematical concepts have been used as inspiration including topology, graph theory, number theory and algebra.

…Continue on Wikipedia

Tesselation

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

tessellation or tiling of the plane is a collection of plane figures that fills the plane with no overlaps and no gaps. One may also speak of tessellations of the parts of the plane or of other surfaces. Generalizations to higher dimensions are also possible. Tessellations frequently appeared in the art of M. C. Escher. Tessellations are seen throughout art history, from ancient architecture to modern art.

… continue on wikipedia

Book: Origami Tesselations

Saturday, January 10th, 2009

Origami Tessellations: Awe-Inspiring Geometric Designs
by Eric Gjerde

Paper artist Eric Gjerde demonstrates 25 of his favorite tessellations and turns them into folding projects for newcomers as well as experienced origamists. With step-by-step instructions, illustrated crease patterns, and how-to photos.


Find it at Amazon