Extra Credit_Sounding Out the Matter Market by Dalton Abbott

March 17th, 2009

Last week, I attended UC San Diego Visual Arts Professor Ricardo Dominguez’s lecture, titled “Sounding Out the Matter Market”. Though I must admit that most of the information discussed was way over my head, as I have virtually no scientific background whatsoever, I did pick up some very interesting information. Dominguez talked extensively of a “Particle Sniffer” that would essentially use smell to decipher and categorize different types of nanoparticles, and idea that I attempted to research more on my own time, though somewhat unsuccessfully. Dominguez then discussed the prevalence of nanotechnology -based ideas in everyday life, using the obvious yet appropriate example of the aptly titled “iPod Nano”. Dominguez then took the viewers on a virtual tour through the particle sniffer, videotaped at a conference called nanoBerlin. Particle sniffers would be set up all throughout a room, and would react at any movement made by the subjects. People appeared to be extremely taken aback by the situation at hand, as the particle sniffer would be aware of any movement whatsoever, whether abrupt or gradual, as the nanoparticles it detected would react in unique ways to any movement at all. Apparently to enhance the dramatic effect of the particle sniffer, scientists would write a script for the sniffer, so whenever movement would be detected, a certain combination of noise, musical notes, and other ambient sounds would be produced. This, in many cases, produced a sort of surreal, dreamlike effect when encountering the particle sniffer, and it would repeat what appeared to be a mantra of sorts, simultaneously surprising and captivating the subject. Dominguez said that due to the increasing popularity of particle sniffer technology, its potential market is expanding and developers and engineers are working on writing new scripts in other languages to allow for global expansion.

Some groups, Dominguez said, simply could not accepting the innovative, seemingly invasive idea behind the design of the particle sniffer. A research and engineering association, CalIT2, said the particle sniffer, through its abrupt, surreal noisemaking and relentlessness, created a deeply hostile environment, one that had the potential to drive scientists and others interested in such subject matter away in confusion and frustration. Dominguez continued on to cite other complaints about the particle sniffer, and there were many that ranged from either completely valid and understandable to downright ludicrous. Dominguez then segued into another important area of nanotechnology, and that is its affect on the consumer market, not only in America but throughout the world. Dominguez claimed that nanomaterials were used in hundreds of different consumer goods, but often were not listed in the ingredients or materials because of their size and discreet existence, such as nanomaterials used in Maybelene lipstick which allow the vibrant red color to remain on one’s lips for such a long period of time.

I found Dominguez’s entire argument very compelling. Similar to Beatriz Da Costa’s “Invisible Earthlings”, Dominguez is bringing nanotechnology to life in a tangible way, one that others, even without a solid intellectual foundation in the field of nanotechnology, can relate to and understand. Dominguez also touches on the importance of nanotechnology in current scientific research and product production, as well as suggesting its potential large role in future scientific developments. Overall, I greatly enjoyed the well organized, insightful lecture by Professor Dominguez, and I gained a good deal of knowledge of a scientific field in which I was previously clueless.

- Dalton Abbott

Extra Credit: Waves of Innovation Outline by Roger Call

March 17th, 2009

Waves of innovation since the industrial revolution

·         Each previous wave was as revolutionary as the present one focused on information technologies

·         The wave is based on intellectual creation

·         Industrialization of culture

o   What will the new techno economic paradigms be

Contemporary Modes of Interdisciplinary

·         Mode 1: integrative – synthesis

o   Two or more disciplines brought together

o   Requires the invention of common models and frameworks and may lead to the establishment of new disciplines

o   Bauhaus- German school founded by Walter Gropius

§  Unified vision of mixed school of art and technology

§  L Moholy-Nagy

§  Weimar ti Dessau 1925

§  More concerned with solving problems than the broad concept, was taken over and the goal was to promote socialism

o   John Whitney, pioneer of digital art

§  Visual music – a visionary dream going back centuries

§  Early animators such as fischinger richter and eggeling pioneered graphics whitney helped bridge the worlds

§  From the earliest work, the research dealt with the methods of precise mechanization

§  Went to junkyards to find ww2 junk equipment for his analog computing device

§   

o   1919 Bauhaus manifesto

 

·         Mode 2: Service – Instrumental

o   The techniques or approaches of one serve as a means to an end defined by the other

o   A commonplace when artists are engaged to demonstrate the capabilities of new technologies

o   The artist has a vision and the engineers and scientists are trying to accomplish it

o   Experiments in art and tech

·         Mode 3: Reflexive – Ontological

o   By challenging the foundational principles of a field, new kinds of objects and knowledge are created

o   Collaboration serves as catalyst and methodology but results are more ad hoc than systematic

Extra Credit_Beatriz Da Costa’s “Invisible Earthlings” by Dalton Abbott

March 16th, 2009

Beatriz Da Costa’s insightful exhibit, “Invisible Earthlings”, was quite an experience in both the intellectual and aesthetic sense. Inside the room in which the exhibit was displayed, a wall of text immediately caught my eye. Upon reading the context for and origination of Da Costa’s ideas, a single sentence struck me as particularly poignant: “How can a revived environmentalism” function if we deny the existence of billions of actors?” Da Costa is talking, of course, of microbes, invisible yet important microorganisms such as bacteria that play a large part in the everyday lives of humans. Da Costa set out to, through methodical research, create a tangible identity for these previously unknown invaders. The majority of Da Costa’s research concentrated on collecting samples from common surfaces such as park benches, gates, and flowers, and examining the types of microbes that were found, as well as analyzing their primary function, hence defining their reason for existing on Earth.

Da Costa’s first specimen, a butterfly bush, yielded Fusarium, a type of bacteria that affect barley and can cause severe crop damage. Inside her garage, Da Costa found Rhizopus, which are known to cause numerous bacterial infections in both humans and animals. On a flower, Da Costa found Conodiobolus, a mold found in soil and decaying debris, which can again cause infections in primarily animals, but rarely in humans as well. On her gate, Da Costa found Staphylococcus, a bacteria that is primarily harmless, but infectious strands can cause ailments such as food poisoning. On a bench, Da Costa found Bacillus, a common bacteria that is mostly harmless. She also found Penicillum, a fungi that can be used to produce penicillin. Da Costa continues on to document various other sources of collection and the bacteria that was documented, along with its potential harmful effects and strands, or lack thereof.

Da Costa’s exhibit was so moving and interesting, in my opinion, partly due to its utter simplicity. Though most are unfamiliar with different types of bacteria and the role that these bacteria may play in one’s life or overall health, all are aware of the existence of many different types of microbes. Da Costa did not present her research merely as an attempt to educate the masses in terms of the role of microbes and their interactions with human life, but rather attempted to provide an accurate portrayal of the true biological breakdown of our planet. Da Costa realizes the importance of microbes in allowing Earth’s complex ecosystems to properly interact and coexist, and through “Invisible Earthlings”, she attempts to provide an identity for these living cells that, despite their important role in affecting human and animal life, are overlooked, a noble, humbling endeavor. Human ignorance and self- centeredness are often responsible for such oversights, as microbes are so small that they are not overtly visible to the human eye, causing humans to disregard not only their existence, but their important function in the biological system. Da Costa, in creating “Invisible Earthlings”, sets out to raise awareness of the simple fact that Earth also plays host to an entire other living population that has just as much of a rightful place to exist in this environment as humans.

- Dalton Abbott

Extra Credit: Biomedical Library Visit by Joseph Duy Nguyen

March 16th, 2009

I did the extra credit for the Biomedical Library that was given out during the fourth week. I haven’t blogged about it since I visited the library several weeks ago. Well, the process of finding the library was full of difficulties. At first I thought it was located in the Biomedical Science Research building next to the Life Science building. I walked in there and wandered around and around trying to find the biomedical library. I ended up asking several people if they know where it was located. A guy told me it is on the bottom floor of the building. I walked down there and could not locate it. Another person told me it is on the second floor. Again, I followed her directions and could not find the library. I was about to give up but then saw an older man and thought he would know. I asked him and he told me it is across the street. I followed his advice. However, the only thing I found was the botanical garden. I walked around the botanical garden for a while and still couldn’t find the library. I tried to ask a student walking by and she told me it is across the street in the factor building. I tried that and finally found the biomedical library. The whole process of trying to find the library took me around 45 minutes. What a bummer!

Well, I walked into the factor building and saw the sign that directed me to the entrance of the biomedical library. The library atmosphere was very quiet, maybe even quieter than the Powell library during the night. I walked around at first to get a feel of the library, or more like to at least grasp the layout of the library, somewhat. Well, the instant I walked through the entrance I can see the reference desk where the library staff/librarians are sitting. I walked past the reference desk and turn right to where there is a long hallway to the next room. I didn’t feel comfortable in the entrance room. The room after the long hallway has a whole bunch of people studying. I went around the shelves to look at the available books. Some of the books have very interesting titles, while others have incomprehensible titles. I ended up picking up a Cell journal and sat down to read it.

I tried to find why the trip to the biomedical library was necessary for a north campus major. The only reason I could come up with before the visit to the library was that it was relevant to the week’s topic about the human body and medicine. However, once I looked through the collection of library books I found more reasons why the library is relevant to a design media art class. There are art-related books in the library. It is more like medicine also include interdisciplinary fields, not only inclusively science fields. For example, there were the art of caring for patients and the art of medicine. Overall, I think the trip to the library was pretty interesting once I found the library.

Here is an image of the entrance to the Biomedical Library I found online:

Just inside the entrance to the Biomedical Library.

Just inside the entrance to the Biomedical Library.

-Joseph Duy Nguyen

Extra Credit: Help with Exhibit Wednesday February 25 by Joseph Duy Nguyen

March 16th, 2009

I attended the extra credit event on Wednesday, February 25th which was to help Beatriz Da Costa set up for her exhibit, Invisible Earthlings. This extra credit event involved the same exhibit that I worked on for the previous extra credit event I did on Monday. I arrived to help out at approximately 2-3pm, I think. When I arrived, there were two students from DESMA 9 class, Tau (Vesna’s personal assistant), Stephanie, and Beatriz present. They just got there a little while ago from what I learned.

Well, the first task that was given to me by Stephanie was to go around the room and erase all the pencil marking on the wall that were made for the installation of the boards. It took a while because for some reason the pencil marking line somewhat got carved into the wall. I think it has to do with the type of paint that was used for the wall. As a result, where there were pencil marks, there were little chip of paint. Fortunately, it was not conspicuous at all. After having done the erasing job, Stephanie told me and other DESMA 9 students to move large sheet of plywood to the inner room of the presentation space. The plywood sheets were somewhat large and that took us a while to finish. After having done that task, Beatriz assigned me the job of screwing on little screw pin to the side of the board so that strings with a stylus can be tied to the screw with the hook at the tip. I think that was the easiest job of the day. There were a total of eight or nine boards and I did them all with ease. In the middle of this all, Tau was helping Beatriz to set up internet tablets on the wall directly above each shelves. I helped Tau stick the electric cord of each internet tablet behind the shelves. After having done that task, Beatriz didn’t have anything for me to do for like the next 15-20 minutes. That made it somewhat boring for me as sitting down on the floor waiting is not fun at all. I guess that’s somewhat good for me though, since I can get some rest from my hectic day. By that time, there were only Tau, Beatriz, another DESMA student, and me left in the in the presentation hall. The other DESMA 9 student went home. Now comes the most difficult part of setting up the exhibit. Tau, another DESMA 9 student, and I had to install the poster sticker onto the wall. This is not like regular sticker where you just stick it onto the wall. This one has separate letters that you need to apply on the wall as a whole. It is basically like car decal sticker, but then this one is a two huge paragraphs of words. I think the whole process took about an hour with three people working on it. We messed with some of the words but they are not noticeable. Beatriz realized that the company who charged 400 dollars for the sticker misprinted a line. She called them up and they said they will have that one line ready by tomorrow for pick up. Beatriz already left by the time we finished installing the sticker. It was 5:30pm or so by the time we finished.

I think this extra credit was more of just plain physical labor than a insightful experience. I guess that might have to do with helping out with uninstalling and installing other exhibits before this one. So the whole setting up for an exhibit is not really new to me anymore. Well, either way, I think this reinforce my lesson that any exhibit requires a lot of work.

Here are some pictures I took:

Exhibit being set up.

Exhibit being set up.

Wall sticker that took forever to install.

Wall sticker that took forever to install.

-Joseph Duy Nguyen

Extra Credit: Help Install Exhibit Monday February 23

March 16th, 2009

On Monday, February 23rd I helped Stephanie Adcock, the assistant director of the art-sci exhibit to start set up for the Invisible Earthling exhibit by Beatriz Da Costa. I came at 12pm to the CNSI building since I signed up to help her out from 12-5pm. I didn’t see anyone in the lobby of the CNSI building and I didn’t know where I was supposed to go to help. I came back to my dorm room and e-mail Professor Vesna to ask her. Stephanie called me at 12:30ish to ask me if I am still helping her to set up the exhibit and I said yes. So I came at 1pm to help her set up. I went up to the fifth floor where the exhibit is supposed to be showing. There I found the Stephanie doing some miscellaneous tasks. I was the only one who showed up from all the people that signed up to help. That kind of sucks as there is no one else to help me. So we begin with the set up.

The first thing we had to do was install different length shelves on the wall with an equal amount of space in between each shelf. It was kind of funny how Stephanie was wondering on how to know how much to put in between each shelves. I guess it has to do with doing administrative work for so long that she kind of forgot math problems. So I figured it out for her. I took the total length of the wall and minus the total length of the board that is supposed to be installed on that wall. That is the total available space in between the boards. Then I divide that number by the number of space between the boards. That gives me the amount of space that is supposed to be in between each board. Stephanie left after that to do some other errands. She ended up giving me the task of marking out where the board is supposed to be installed and to paint the board and mounting bracket as well as measure out where the bracket is supposed to be installed on the board. There are not many tasks but each of them took quite a while to complete.

I attempted to do all the measurements and marking on the wall, which include calculating the space in between each board for another wall too. That took a while to do as I had to measure across and 4 feet from the ground. It sucks for me because I was the only one there and I had no one to hold the tape measure for me to mark the wall. I had to improvise and attempt to do both the measurement and marking. I think it took me a little over an hour to finish the measurement and marking. Then I had to do the measuring on the board for the installation of the mounting bracket. After that I attempted to paint the board but I found out that the paintbrush that was available was stiff and hard from the previous painting session. That makes it very difficult to put a coat of paint on the board evenly. So I tried to call Stephanie and ask her but she didn’t pick up. I waited in the room for her for about an hour but nothing happened. So I left. She called me back later and said it was OK that I didn’t get that done. That was my experience with helping to set up an exhibit. Once again, I learn that setting up and uninstalling and exhibit is no easy task.

Here are some pictures that I took:

Boards waiting to be mounted.

Boards waiting to be mounted.

Room to be set up for exhibit.

Room to be set up for exhibit.

-Joseph Duy Nguyen

Extra Credit: Invisible Earthlings Exhibit by Joseph Duy Nguyen

March 16th, 2009

I attended the Invisible Earthlings exhibit by Beatriz Da Costa on February 27th for extra credit. The exhibit was a disappointment to me. For me it had no purpose besides telling people that they should be aware of microorganisms that are an essential part of our environment. We should not pay attention only to the macro species but also to the microorganisms. From what I know, that is the whole purpose of the exhibit.

So I helped out to set up the exhibit and it did not seem so bad. However, once I became part of the audience and viewed the exhibit in the perspective of an audience, I can’t help but give the exhibit a bad score. The exhibit mainly contained shelves with Petri dishes on them and an internet tablet attached to the wall above the shelves. Inside the Petri dish are supposedly the microorganisms. In total there are approximately eight shelves. Each shelf contains microorganism that are present in different location around Beatriz’s house. For example, there were some from the porch, under the garbage bins, bench, garage, and etc. Each location has various microorganisms, mainly bacteria. The bacteria name and a short description of each bacteria was displayed on the internet tablet which used a stylus. So yea, the audience is supposed to walk around and look at each shelves display. Beatriz supposedly used a scientific procedure to identify the microorganisms. Speaking from a scientific research point of view, the whole exhibit is pointless and has no credibility. The only thing she shows us is the final results of all the microorganisms around her house. Anyone can do that by just researching on the internet for microorganisms present in the human household. I’m not trying to be critical or anything but I just see no point in the exhibit. This is supposed to be an art-sci exhibit. I can see the attempt at the science aspect, but I do not see any for the art aspect.

Overall, I was totally disappointed at the exhibit. I was expecting something really interesting and different, but what I saw was nothing short of a high school report of microorganism around the household. The purpose of the exhibit was to make people more aware of how microorganisms play an important part in our environment. Well, I think this is a college environment and even people who are not bright know about microorganisms. In a sense, she is just reiterating common knowledge. People tend to not really discuss about microorganisms because they don’t affect people’s life in a direct way. My extra credit blog sounds very critical of the exhibit but this is my honest thought about the exhibit. I didn’t even bother to discuss the various bacteria because a lot of those are common ones such as E. coli and Staphylococcus.

Here are some pictures I took of the exhibit:

Snapshot of Internet Tablet

Snapshot of Internet Tablet

Snapshot of exhibit.

Snapshot of exhibit.

-Joseph Duy Nguyen

Extra Credit: Linda Weintraub Presentation by Joseph Duy Nguyen

March 16th, 2009

I attended the extra credit presentation by Linda Weintraub on the Tuesday of 8th week at the Broad Art Center. Her presentation is titled Drop Dead Gorgeous: Beauty and the Aesthetics of Activism. She discusses a variety of topics but the gist of her presentation was that beauty can be defined in many ways. The most common definition she gave us is that people define beauty by the physical outer appearance. That I agree with her. People nowadays tend to judge people by their outer physical appearance. For example, if someone dresses really nice and spiffy, people tend to get the impression that he is well-mannered. Likewise, if someone is dressed scraggly, people will think of him as an unpleasant man. This same type of concept applies to beauty. Weintraub talks about society’s perception of beauty for some time in the beginning of her presentation.

From the introduction of society’s perception of beauty, Weintraub transitioned to different artists’ perception of beauty. There were quite a few, but two artists stood out the most for me. Those two artists are Andy Goldsworthy and Damien Hirst. Goldsworthy’s artwork consists mainly of artworks constructed on site. Weintraub showed us a few of his artwork, which somewhat interested me. After the lecture I went back to my room and actually looked up Goldsworthy and found many more of his artworks. There were some very amazing pieces. I like his Yorkshire Sculpture Park piece the most. I find that his artwork truly shows his genius. He is able to think on site and create art with what nature provides him. The same can be said of Damien Hirst. Hirst shows his creative side by doing something is against society’s perception. Most artists try to create a piece of artwork that is pleasing to the majority of the audience. Hirst does almost the exact opposite. His artwork is disgusting and unpleasant to the majority of society. I think Hirst thinks of beauty more in term of function than appearance. His artworks mostly consist of dead corpses arranged in thematic ways. His artwork with a rotting cow head stood out the most for me. Who would have thought of that possibly being an artwork? Artists should think outside the box. When I say outside the box, I mean outside of the context of society. Artists should not be restricted to how society feels and thinks about certain topics. That is my perception of how art should be addressed. I’m a science major so maybe my way of thinking is different from artists but that is my two-piece.

Weintraub then goes on to discuss how we should think of beauty in terms of how it can improve the environment. For her, artwork should be valued and created based on the function it does for the environment. I guess she is more of an environmentalist-artist than media artist. Some people in the audience did not totally agree with her and stated their opinion. It’s nice how the people who didn’t agree with everything she said expressed their view in a polite manner instead of just straight out denouncing her ideology. For me, I got confused on where the borderline between being an environmentalist and being an artist. Overall, I think the presentation was worthwhile to hear, considering she is a guest speaker to UCLA in general.

Yorkshire Sculpture Garden by Andy Goldsworthy

Yorkshire Sculpture Garden by Andy Goldsworthy

Dead cow head by Damien Hirst.

Dead cow head by Damien Hirst.

-Joseph Duy Nguyen

Extra Credit: North/South Mixer and Particle Group Exhibit by Joseph Duy Nguyen

March 16th, 2009

I went to the extra credit event North/South Mixer and the Particle Group exhibition. When I first came through the door of the CNSI building, I was somewhat nervous because I did not know what to do or who to look for since I am a freshmen. Well, anyway, I walked in and signed in as the outside guard told me to do. After signing in, I had absolutely no clue on what to do as I see people standing around socializing while eating and drinking. I didn’t dare to go up to a group and join in or go get some food so I just stood around for a while. Luckily, I stood next to a guy who did not have a clue on what he is supposed to do as well. We started talking and discuss various subjects. I found out he was also in the DESMA 9 class and that he was there for the purpose of extra credit.

The two of us talked about DESMA 9 and what’s the goal of that class. We both agreed on how we don’t feel like there is any objective to the class. We couldn’t find what goal the class was trying to approach or solve. Anyway, we talked for quite a while, maybe 15 minutes or so. His friends joined us and we actually got a group of people. Some of his friends were north campus majors. These north campus major friends have a somewhat different mindset than mine, which is of a south campus major. We disagree on some topic such as which parts of campus majors are more difficult and which ones are more intelligent. The north campus major students feel that south campus major students are a bunch of cutthroat premed students who are only book smart, whereas north campus major students are gifted and talented in constructing things for human enjoyment. Well, in short, I did get some socializing experience with north campus major students and learned some of the differences and similarities that we have with each other.

After the whole process of socializing, I felt somewhat more comfortable and wandered around, particularly around the numerous white box set up around one part of the CNSI lobby. I didn’t know what the boxes were for at first since I was not told what they were and why they were in the room. I walked around the box and sometimes I would hear a really weird sound. I was very curious about the purpose of those white boxes so I went up to the front desk. There I found various flyers and from those flyers, I found why those white boxes are there. The white boxes are actually the exhibit by the particle group. The white boxes have nanoparticle sensor on them that produce sound waves when they detect nanoparticles from the people nearby. The purpose of the exhibit is to make people aware of all the nanoparticle that are on their clothes and body. The exhibit is to provoke a thought reaction in people about nanotechnology. Nanotechnology release nanoparticles into the environment. Nanoparticles are thought to be a risk to human health. This got me really interested and I actually went back to my room to look up the issues with nanoparticles after experiencing some more of the sensor going off whenever I pass by them.

Overall, the North/South mixer and the particle exhibit were very interesting and I learned something new from both of the event.

Here is a picture I found of the Mixer online.

Here is a picture I found of the Mixer online.

Picture of Particle Exhibit

Picture of Particle Exhibit

-Joseph Duy Nguyen

Extra Credit: Help with Uninstalling Particle Exhibit by Joseph Duy Nguyen

March 15th, 2009

I helped Nina Waisman uninstall the Nanoparticle Sniffer exhibit located in the CNSI lobby. The work needed to take the exhibit apart and wrap it up for shipping was phenomenal. I just got out of class, got lunch in the dining hall, and was about to go over to the CNSI building by 3pm when Nina called me to tell me she would be running late and wouldn’t be there at the CNSI building until 3:30pm. She told me to not be there until 3:30pm since there wouldn’t be anyone there to tell me what to do beforehand. I arrived there at around 3:30pm or so and signed in with the front desk guard of the CNSI building. There were two people who already started with the uninstallation. One of them was a student in my DESMA 9 class and the other one was a man who worked for Nina. I’m not sure if he was Nina’s husband or not.

Well, the first thing Nina assigned me was to pack away all the speakers that were inside the big white boxes that I mentioned earlier in my Particle exhibit extra credit blog. The speakers come in pairs and there were a total of four 6 pairs of speakers. I had to rewrap the speakers and put them back in their original boxes. That was a pretty easy task. However, the next task was a pain in the butt that took quite a while to finish. Each of us had to remove the wires that were connected throughout the exhibit. All of the wires are attached to an amplifier. The hard part was that the wires were interconnected and were hooked through the white boxes that housed the sensors and the speakers. We had to be extra careful with the wire since the tip is very fragile. The wire is not like regular speaker wire. The wire are supposedly connected to the sensor that detected the nanoparticles. The whole process took a while. If I remember correctly, we finished up with the wires around 6pm. It took several hours to just put away the wires. Imagine the rest of the exhibit.

I was about to leave at around 8pm to go to my Taekwondo class but I ended up staying until the end to help. I felt bad about leaving only three people to do the whole uninstallation. After the wire, we did the wrapping of the white boxes. Some of the boxes were like 8-10 feet talls. There were a total of about 9 boxes. Each of the white boxes had to be laid down flat on a layer of clear plastic on top of a blanket. We had to tape cardboard covering to all of the edges and corner of the white boxes. The purpose was to prevent the edges and corners from being damaged through the transportation process. It was a very tedious process. After putting on all of the cardboard cover, we had to wrap the clear plastic and the blanket around the whole white boxes. The whole process was done to each box. This may sound easy, but in reality was very time-consuming. While the two other males finish up the wrapping, I helped Nina transported all of the white boxes up to 5th floor. Using a dolly we carefully transported the wrapped-up white boxes. Near the end, the other two males joined us to finish up the whole process. Afterward, it was only a matter of finishing up miscellaneous cleaning job. We finally finished around midnight. Wow, the whole process of uninstalling the exhibit took almost 9 hours.

From the whole process, I think I learned one thing and that is art exhibition is a time consuming event. No matter how the exhibit may look simple to the audience, the manpower put behind each exhibit is tremendous.

-Joseph Duy Nguyen